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== Install instructions ==
== Install instructions ==
-
* Install the [http://maemo.org/packages/view/easy-deb-chroot/ easy-deb-chroot package]. It can be found in the [[Extras]] repository. There may be a newer version in the [[Extras-devel]] repository. (Enabling Extras-devel is a dangerous area and you should disable it as soon as you are done installing Easy Debian, but Easy Debian is rather safe and it is optified). Once installed several new shortcut icons will be available on the applications menu.
+
* You need to install the [http://maemo.org/packages/view/easy-deb-chroot/ easy-deb-chroot package]. It can be found in the [[Extras]] repository. There may be a newer version in the [[Extras-devel]] repository. (Enabling Extras-devel is a dangerous area and you should disable it as soon as you are done installing Easy Debian, but Easy Debian is rather safe and it is optified.)
-
 
+
* Once installed several new shortcut icons will be available on the applications menu. You will need to first run the one called "Debian Image Installer". A terminal program will open and ask you where to place the image file (after decompression it will be a 2 GB file), either on the [[Nokia N900|N900's]] built in storage (under MyDocs), or on an external MicroSD card (if available). That will start the download of the compressed image (about 300 MB) and eventual extraction of the image file. It may take more than 15 minutes to download if you have fast Internet connection, and another 30 minutes  or more to extract it on your tablet. Make sure that there are no other processes running and that the extraction is not interrupted.
-
* Go to application menu and run the application called "Debian Image Installer". A terminal program will open and guide you through several steps of pre-configuration:
+
-
** '''First screen''' will give you '''a warning''' which you should acknowledge by clicking OK.
+
-
** '''Second screen''' will ask you to '''Choose an image to download''' and give you 3 image options. For the sake of this tutorial, I choose the first option, '''image v3e'''.
+
-
** '''Third screen''' will ask you to '''Choose Memory Card''' where to place the image file to either MyDocs (which in our case, is the internal memory of the phone) or MicroSD (assuming you have a miscroSD installed in your phone) (after decompression it will be a 2 GB file), either on the [[Nokia N900|N900's]] built in storage (under MyDocs), or on an external MicroSD card (if available). That will start the download of the compressed image (about 300 MB) and eventual extraction of the image file. It may take more than 15 minutes to download if you have fast Internet connection, and another 30 minutes  or more to extract it on your tablet. Make sure that there are no other processes running and that the extraction is not interrupted.
+
** You can check for a successful download and extraction by typing<pre>ls -l /home/user/MyDocs/debian*</pre> in [[terminal|XTerminal]]. The compressed image name has the ending .img.ext2.lzma; when decompressed the file name ends in .img.ext2 and it should have a file size of exactly 2147483648 bytes.
** You can check for a successful download and extraction by typing<pre>ls -l /home/user/MyDocs/debian*</pre> in [[terminal|XTerminal]]. The compressed image name has the ending .img.ext2.lzma; when decompressed the file name ends in .img.ext2 and it should have a file size of exactly 2147483648 bytes.
-
* This step is an alternate way to do the previous step: You can manually download the image file from [http://qole.org/files//debian-m5-v3e.img.ext2.lzma here]. Afterward you will have to copy it into <code>/home/user/MyDocs/</code> or into <code>/media/mmc1/</code> depending on whether you want it installed on the internal storage or on a removable storage.  Then, when you run "Debian Image Installer" it will detect that you already have the file and proceed to extract it and set it up for you. For detection of your already placed debian* file stated above, the Debian Image Installer still need to connect to the internet for file checking purpose. If you have a faster computer with [http://www.7-zip.org/ programs] to unpack [[:wikipedia:Lempel%E2%80%93Ziv%E2%80%93Markov_chain_algorithm|lzma]]-compressed files, you may also skip the Debian Image Installer by copying the uncompressed file by USB to the <code>/home/user/MyDocs/</code> folder.
+
* This step is an alternate way to do the previous step: You can manually download the image file from [http://qole.org/files//debian-m5-v3d.img.ext2.lzma here]. Afterward you will have to copy it into <code>/home/user/MyDocs/</code> or into <code>/media/mmc1/</code> depending on whether you want it installed on the internal storage or on a removable storage.  Then, when you run "Debian Image Installer" it will detect that you already have the file and proceed to extract it and set it up for you. For detection of your already placed debian* file stated above, the Debian Image Installer still need to connect to the internet for file checking purpose. If you have a faster computer with [http://www.7-zip.org/ programs] to unpack [[:wikipedia:Lempel%E2%80%93Ziv%E2%80%93Markov_chain_algorithm|lzma]]-compressed files, you may also skip the Debian Image Installer by copying the uncompressed file by USB to the <code>/home/user/MyDocs/</code> folder.
-
 
+
* If you have more than one image file, you should edit <code>/home/user/.chroot</code> to select the one you want to load. Default is first in <code>/home/user/MyDocs/debian*.img*</code>, <code>/media/mmc1/debian*.img*</code>
* If you have more than one image file, you should edit <code>/home/user/.chroot</code> to select the one you want to load. Default is first in <code>/home/user/MyDocs/debian*.img*</code>, <code>/media/mmc1/debian*.img*</code>
* When you get the "Congratulations!" message from the installer (or immediately if you have placed an uncompressed image file into /home/user/MyDocs/ yourself), you can launch Easy Debian by one of the Debian application icons or by typing "debbie" in XTerminal.
* When you get the "Congratulations!" message from the installer (or immediately if you have placed an uncompressed image file into /home/user/MyDocs/ yourself), you can launch Easy Debian by one of the Debian application icons or by typing "debbie" in XTerminal.
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; Close Debian : for unmounting the Debian image and shutting down all running Debian processes
; Close Debian : for unmounting the Debian image and shutting down all running Debian processes
-
; Deb Img Install : for the initial download and extraction of the Debian image. For installing a new version of the Debian image from [http://qole.org/files http://qole.org/files], delete the old image (or move/rename it appropriately) and rerun Deb Img Install.
+
; Deb Img Install : for the initial download and extraction of the Debian image. For installing a new version of the Debian image from http:qole.org/files, delete the old image (or move/rename it appropriately) and rerun Deb Img Install.
; Debian chroot : this runs "sudo debian" in XTerminal, which gives root access to the Debian image. This can be used for modifying the Debian image and installing further applications from the command line. The root file system of Maemo is not visible from within Debian chroot, except /home and /home/user/MyDocs, so you cannot ruin the Maemo firmware from here.
; Debian chroot : this runs "sudo debian" in XTerminal, which gives root access to the Debian image. This can be used for modifying the Debian image and installing further applications from the command line. The root file system of Maemo is not visible from within Debian chroot, except /home and /home/user/MyDocs, so you cannot ruin the Maemo firmware from here.
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   type pulse
   type pulse
  }
  }
-
 
-
== complete dist-upgrade to Squeeze ==
 
-
 
-
Easy Debian is a mix of the Debian releases Lenny and Squeeze which leads to some problems like some silently broken packages and troubles when trying to install new software. Therefore a dist-upgrade to a pure Squeeze system might be useful. Usually this is no problem in Debian but since Easy Debian is restricted by the underlying Maemo in some ways there are some things to take care of.
 
-
 
-
One thing that has to be taken care of before doing the dist-upgrade is the special keyboard that we use. Debian's standard keyboard definition (which will be installed during the dist-upgrade) won't work properly so we'll have to make sure we will use the one we have already. All we have to do for that is to copy Easy Debian's folder '''/usr/share/X11/xkb''' somewhere else:
 
-
 
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cp -r /usr/share/X11/xkb /home/user
 
-
 
-
The (one) usual way for a dist-upgrade in Debian is to change all the entries in /etc/apt/sources.list to the new release and then run as root (or preceded by sudo):
 
-
 
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apt-get update
 
-
apt-get dist-upgrade
 
-
 
-
So basically your sources.list should contain these lines or some mirrors (everything else should be deactivated with a leading '''#''' ):
 
-
 
-
deb http://ftp.debian.org/debian squeeze main contrib non-free
 
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#deb http://www.debian-multimedia.org squeeze main
 
-
 
-
[EDIT: By july 2013, the debian-multimedia.org domain was not anymore owned by the third-party supporters who owned it before! For security reasons it is not recommended to use it. Nevertheless, the official repository has improved its support over several mulimedia formats making third-party repositories unncecessary]
 
-
 
-
Easy Debian has only a limited amount of disk space, so we'll temporarily create a new place to store the downloaded new packages in MyDocs:
 
-
 
-
mkdir -p /home/user/MyDocs/archives/partial
 
-
sudo mount --bind /home/user/MyDocs/archives /var/cache/apt/archives
 
-
 
-
Then we'll do the dist-upgrade. Unfortunately Maemo has a very snappish watchdog that reboots your phone if it thinks it hangs due to a runaway process. This is almost certainly triggered when doing mayor package installations with normal process priority. So we'll do the dist-upgrade wit the lowest priority using the '''nice''' command:
 
-
 
-
nice -n 19 sudo apt-get update
 
-
nice -n 19 sudo apt-get dist-upgrade
 
-
 
-
This will take very long. So you should make sure the following conditions are fulfilled:
 
-
# You have a running internet connection.
 
-
# Your N900 is plugged to the power pack
 
-
# You have plenty of time where you don't need the phone (doing it in the late evening just before you go to bed would be a good time).
 
-
 
-
 
-
After all that is done we'll clean some things up. Close Easy Debian (use the Icon in Maemo just to be sure) and delete the archives folder in MyDocs.
 
-
 
-
Now you'll notice six regressions:
 
-
#The shutdown and reboot options in the LXDE logout dialogue are gone. It doesn't matter, just use '''logout''' instead. Since we're in a chroot and not on a real machine there's no real difference.
 
-
#All the blue keyboard buttons won't work anymore and the blue arrow key will behave strangely. This is because during the dist-upgrade the quite special Maemo keyboard layout used by Easy Debian was overwritten with a generic layout. This is why we made a backup of our keyboard folder right at the beginning. Now it's time to restore it - from within Easy Debian chroot, do (remember about prefixing with 'sudo', if You're executing it from within LXDE instead!):<pre>sudo mv /home/user/xkb /usr/share/X11</pre>Then close Easy Debian and after restarting it the keyboard should work fine.
 
-
#After changing to another application via Ctrl + Backspace and returning to Easy Debian your mouse and keyboard will behave very odd. Lots of click events might not be recognized and your keyboard won't write but instead execute shortcut options. The reason is that for some reason Easy Debian doesn't catch the Ctrl release event anymore when leaving it. Pressing Ctrl once after returning to Easy Debian will solve that. Unfortunately you'll have to do that every time you return to Easy Debian. The reason for this behavior isn't absolutely clear but it seems like this doesn't happen in all cases. It might be related to the xserver-xephyr package in Squeeze. See below!
 
-
#Loading the Easy Debian desktop will take very long and a pcmanfm (file manager) will pop up automatically. This is because pcmanfm is also used for some desktop management in LXDE but as a demon. The syntax of the demon switch has changed between the LXDE versions in Lenny and Squeeze. In the file '''/etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE/autostart''' change the line '''@pcmanfm -d''' to '''@pcmanfm -desktop''' to take care for that change.
 
-
#Some programs (e.g. iceweasel) that are started via debbie from Maemo will throw a dbus-related warning but seem to work fine. So it should be safe to ignore that warning. If you want to get rid of the popup uninstall the package that causes these popups.
 
-
#Sound in Easy Debian won't work anymore. This is because there were some changes in pulseaudio between version 0.9.15 and 0.9.16 which lead to incompatibilities. Maemo uses 0.9.15 so Lenny's 0.9.10 works while Squeeze's 0.9.21 does not. Installing the latest working version 0.9.15 (or any prior to that) would normally break Squeeze's package system so we'll have to fool it so that it actually uses 0.9.15 but thinks it has 0.9.21. To do that there are some modified packages available at qole's server:
 
-
::http://qole.org/files/pulseaudio_easydebian_squeeze.tar.gz (please note: These modified packages are a pretty evil hack and neither Debian nor pulseaudio can be held responsible for any incompatibilities caused by them.)
 
-
 
-
::The easiest way to install them is to create a new folder, change to it, unpack the archive and install them via dpkg. But since these packages are technically from the Lenny era we'll need two further dependencies which are not available in Squeeze anymore. So let's start:
 
-
mkdir pulse
 
-
cd pulse
 
-
wget http://qole.org/files/pulseaudio_easydebian_squeeze.tar.gz
 
-
tar -zxf pulseaudio_easydebian_squeeze.tar.gz
 
-
wget http://ftp.debian.org/debian/pool/main/p/policykit/libpolkit2_0.9-2_armel.deb
 
-
wget http://ftp.debian.org/debian/pool/main/p/policykit/libpolkit-dbus2_0.9-2_armel.deb
 
-
nice -n 19 sudo dpkg -i *.deb
 
-
::When this is done sound should work again. Now we have to make sure that these changed packages won't be overwritten by regular Debian updates. So we'll set them on "hold":
 
-
sudo echo libpulse0 "hold" | dpkg --set-selections
 
-
sudo echo libpulse-browse0 "hold" | dpkg --set-selections
 
-
sudo echo libpulse-mainloop-glib0 "hold" | dpkg --set-selections
 
-
sudo echo pulseaudio "hold" | dpkg --set-selections
 
-
sudo echo pulseaudio-esound-compat "hold" | dpkg --set-selections
 
-
sudo echo pulseaudio-module-gconf "hold" | dpkg --set-selections
 
-
sudo echo pulseaudio-module-x11 "hold" | dpkg --set-selections
 
-
sudo echo pulseaudio-utils "hold" | dpkg --set-selections
 
-
 
-
=== portrait mode ===
 
-
(If you use one of Estel's images based on Debian Squeeze you already have all the prequisites, so this only applies if you dist-upgraded from one of the older mixed Lenny/Squeeze images by qole.)
 
-
 
-
You might have tried to switch Easy Debian to portrait mode using a command like this:
 
-
xrandr --output default --rotate left
 
-
In this case you will have noticed that although the display output was rotated but that the mouse cursor will still behave as if the desktop was running in landscape mode. This is due to a bug in xserver-xephyr which fortunately has a fix:
 
-
https://bugs.freedesktop.org/show_bug.cgi?id=37331
 
-
 
-
However, that fix didn't make it into the Debian Squeeze package but the package from the backports is reasonably up to date that the fix could be easily applied to it.
 
-
 
-
If you want to use the fixed package you first need to do a complete dist-upgrade to Squeeze, then activate the squeeze-backports repository, install xsever-xephyr from it and after that install this patched backports package:
 
-
http://lorienart.pl/cover/xserver-xephyr_1.10.4-1~bpo60+99_armel.deb
 
== FAQ ==
== FAQ ==
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:Also, when downloading packages, remember to frequently use "<code>apt-get clean</code>" to clear out old downloaded packages. That will help with free space.
:Also, when downloading packages, remember to frequently use "<code>apt-get clean</code>" to clear out old downloaded packages. That will help with free space.
-
:If you're comfortable with the command line, you can use the technique listed in [http://talk.maemo.org/showthread.php?p=233305#post233305 this post] to double your install space.
+
:If you're comfortable with the command line, you can use the technique listed in this post to double your install space.
:Even with all of these tricks, you'll still run out of room fairly quickly. You'll probably have to uninstall packages in order to add new ones.
:Even with all of these tricks, you'll still run out of room fairly quickly. You'll probably have to uninstall packages in order to add new ones.
-
:More advanced users can put a minimal system into an empty image and build a custom set of apps using [http://talk.maemo.org/showthread.php?p=233515#post233515 this post]. The most advanced and best way: partition your SD card and put your Debian fs there.
+
:More advanced users can put a minimal system into an empty image and build a custom set of apps using this post. The most advanced and best way: partition your SD card and put your Debian fs there.
'''Q:''' What's this "Iceweasel"?<br>
'''Q:''' What's this "Iceweasel"?<br>
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'''NOTE:''' If you are using Deblet, delete the <code>/home/user/.synchroot</code> file before running Easy Debian for the first time, so your Deblet config files don't get overwritten. Remember that you'll need to make a user called "user" in Deblet (with the proper ID) for things to work correctly. Also note that your maemo home directory will be used by default. This can also be changed in the .chroot file.
'''NOTE:''' If you are using Deblet, delete the <code>/home/user/.synchroot</code> file before running Easy Debian for the first time, so your Deblet config files don't get overwritten. Remember that you'll need to make a user called "user" in Deblet (with the proper ID) for things to work correctly. Also note that your maemo home directory will be used by default. This can also be changed in the .chroot file.
-
 
-
== Debian "wheezy" images ==
 
-
 
-
A number of experimental images using Debian Wheezy (testing) are now available (August 2012) from [http://talk.maemo.org/showpost.php?p=1251091&postcount=2821 this post on TMO], courtesy of Roberto Colistete.
 
-
 
-
=== Installing experimental images ===
 
-
 
-
Experimental images are not known to the Debian Image Installer, nor are they (yet) hosted by qole, so you will need to download the desired image file into the desired location (using wget or similar) and decompress it with "lzma -d <filename>". From there, you should be able to launch it as normal; the Deb Chroot and Debian LXDE icons work as expected.
 
-
 
-
=== Known issues ===
 
-
 
-
==== Chromium web browser ====
 
-
 
-
Chromium is broken for arm in Debian wheezy. Estel [http://talk.maemo.org/showpost.php?p=1254678&postcount=2831 reports a successful workaround] using chromium from debian squeeze.
 
-
 
-
===== Chromium on Sci image =====
 
-
 
-
If you try to do this on the Sci image (Sulu via rcolistete), then after enabling the squeeze sources you'll run into apt-get/apt-cache errors of "the value 'testing' is invalid for APT::Default-Release. Work around these with "aptitude -t stable install chromium-browser".
 
-
 
-
This will get your browser installed, but it will then complain (if started from command line) about the lack of libesd0 and libcurl3. You can install both of these, also from squeeze sources, upon which it will start without complaining. Also, if you've been testing it as root, then you'll want to "chown -R user /home/user/.cache/chromium" and "chown -R user /home/user/.config/chromium" for it to work properly as "user".
 
-
 
-
== Optimising your EasyDebian images ==
 
-
 
-
=== Grow your image file to 4GB ===
 
-
 
-
Debian Wheezy takes up more space than Squeeze. If you want to enlarge your image file, the maximum file size that you can support on a FAT32 partition is 4GB minus one byte, or 4,294,967,295 bytes. Beyond that, you'll have to use a dedicated partition.
 
-
 
-
So, without harming portability, we can increase our image file by 1GB (almost) and then grow the file system to fit it. To increase the image size, first, concatenate 1GB of zeroes onto the end of the file:
 
-
<pre>dd if=/dev/zero bs=1M count=1024 >> /path/to/image.ext3</pre>
 
-
 
-
Note that the ">>" is critical here, meaning append the zeroes to the end of the file; accidentally use ">" and you'll overwrite the image. The command will "fail" with an error when you hit 4GB on a FAT32 filesystem, but, don't worry, that's because we hit the maximum file size before we ran out of zeroes. Our image file will still be the desired maximum possible size. Now, we need to unmount and remount the image, in order for the loop mount to pick up the larger "device" that we just created. This is as simple as running the Close Debian script, then restarting Easy Debian via Deb Chroot (or sudo debian).
 
-
 
-
Finally, we grow our ext3 file system to match. From within the chroot, issue a
 
-
<pre>resize2fs /dev/loop0</pre>
 
-
and your filesystem will be extended to 4GB.
 
-
 
-
=== Convert your image file to ext3, ext4, xfs, etc. ===
 
-
 
-
You might wish to use a newer file system for improved data integrity, efficiency or CPU performance; this is supported with recent versions of kernel-power and CSSU and can reduce CPU overhead.
 
-
 
-
==== ext2 to ext3 ====
 
-
 
-
This is fairly easy; from within the chroot, issue:
 
-
 
-
<pre>tune2fs -j /dev/loop0</pre>
 
-
 
-
assuming your first partition that is mounted on "/" is called loop0. It may be called dm-0, or anything else. To be sure, check it out. Issue:
 
-
 
-
<pre>df -k</pre>
 
-
 
-
and you should get an output like this:
 
-
 
-
<pre>
 
-
Filesystem      1K-blocks    Used  Available Use% Mounted on
 
-
/dev/loop0        2064208  1733036    331172  84% /
 
-
/dev/mmcblk0p2    2064208    796220  1163132  41% /home
 
-
/dev/mmcblk0p1  28312128  2252928  26059200  8% /home/user/MyDocs
 
-
</pre>
 
-
 
-
'''Example:'''
 
-
If the first partition mounted on "/" is called /dev/dm-0 instead of /dev/loop0, then the command should be:
 
-
 
-
<pre>tune2fs -j /dev/dm-0</pre>
 
-
 
-
'''end of Example'''
 
-
 
-
This command will add a journal to your ext2 filesystem. It will appear that it waits for your input since it will throw you a colon "'''Creating journal inode:'''". Do not type anything and wait approx. one minute to finish by itself. Close down Easy Debian (it is advisable to close it through it's specific icon named "Close Debian" which will properly close Debian and unmont everything).
 
-
 
-
Then, from Maemo's X Terminal as root, rename your image file from <image-name>.ext2 to <image-name>.ext3.
 
-
After that, edit /home/user/.chroot file by issuing:
 
-
 
-
<pre>nano /home/user/.chroot</pre>
 
-
 
-
and change ext2 into ext3 on those 2 unhashed fields:
 
-
 
-
<pre>
 
-
# Some examples:
 
-
IMGFILE=/home/user/MyDocs/debian-m5-v3e.img.ext2
 
-
#IMGFILE=/media/mmc1/debian-squeeze-m5.img.ext2
 
-
#IMGFILE=/dev/mmcblk1p2
 
-
#IMGFILE=/dev/mmcblk0p4
 
-
# Filesystem used; must always be set when using a partition.
 
-
# Default: from extension of IMGFILE, or ext2.
 
-
IMGFS=ext2
 
-
</pre>
 
-
 
-
Restart Easy Debian, and away you go. Take note that adding a journal adds overhead and may not improve performance; understand the implications before you proceed.
 
-
 
-
==== ext3 to ext4 (or anything else) ====
 
-
 
-
A word of warning. The version of e2fsprogs in Maemo is ancient, and xfs-tools seems to be non-existent, so if you use ext4 or xfs, you will lose the ability to fsck the image on the device itself. This is fine if you have (and are happy to use) a Linux PC; if not then you may want to stick to ext2/ext3.
 
-
 
-
Migrating from ext3 to ext4 has no impact on existing files that were written under ext3, only on newly written files. Therefore, to achieve the expected benefit from a migration to ext4, you'll need to create a fresh image of the desired size, format it and copy the contents of your old image onto your new one. You'll probably want to do this over USB from a Linux PC rather than from the device itself, both for speed reasons and (probably) for newer versions of the applicable filesystem tools.
 
-
 
-
First, create a file of the desired size, either with dd or by simply making a copy of the image file that you intend to clone.
 
-
 
-
<pre>cp <image-name>.img.ext3 <image-name>.img.ext4</pre>
 
-
 
-
Now format the new image file with the desired file system. We'll use ext4 here, but this should work for any filesystem that is supported by kernel-power.
 
-
 
-
<pre>mkfs.ext4 /path/to/mounted/n900/<image-name>.img.ext4</pre>
 
-
 
-
You might want to consider the "-T small" option to mkfs, which will yield a smaller block size (1KB) and more inodes, otherwise you'll be limited to 262,144 files in 1,048,575 blocks, also, at your option "-m 0" to set the reserved blocks count to zero (do not keep 5% back for the superuser). Once that's done, we need to mount both images, and clone the old one to the new one:
 
-
<pre>
 
-
mkdir /mnt/old
 
-
mkdir /mnt/new
 
-
mount -t ext3 -o loop /path/to/mounted/n900/<image-name>.img.ext3 /mnt/old
 
-
mount -t ext4 -o loop /path/to/mounted/n900/<image-name>.img.ext4 /mnt/new
 
-
cp -a /mnt/old/* /mnt/new/
 
-
umount /mnt/new
 
-
umount /mnt/old
 
-
</pre>
 
-
 
-
It does no harm at this point to run a filesystem check on the newly created image. You'll also need to make sure that the image is either configured in .chroot or is the first such image in the directory in order for the Easy Debian chroot scripts to pick it up.
 
-
 
-
== Directory based chroot ==
 
-
 
-
First copy the filesystem to your homefs. Then edit your ~/.chroot, so that it contains
 
-
 
-
    IMGFILE=none
 
-
    CHROOT=/path/to/chroot
 
-
 
-
TODO: Do some magic with closechroot
 
== Donations ==
== Donations ==
If you feel overwhelmed by gratitude towards [http://talk.maemo.org/member.php?u=10410 qole] for bringing a full-fledged Debian OS to your device, consider donating at [http://qole.org qole.org]. [DISCLAIMER: This entry was inserted by a grateful user, not qole himself.]
If you feel overwhelmed by gratitude towards [http://talk.maemo.org/member.php?u=10410 qole] for bringing a full-fledged Debian OS to your device, consider donating at [http://qole.org qole.org]. [DISCLAIMER: This entry was inserted by a grateful user, not qole himself.]
-
 
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